Austin Powers in Goldmember (2002)

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Upon learning that his father has been kidnapped, Austin Powers must travel to 1975 and defeat the aptly named villain Goldmember – who is working with Dr. Evil. (IMDb)
There are moments that reflect the energetic creativity of the first two films (see the meta-opening credits, subtitle mix-up at the office, “boobs” naming gag) and the Mini-Me+Austin slapstick scene was pretty funny, but besides that it’s pretty much all distasteful potty humour (see especially Fat Bastard after sumo-wrestling), overly sexual and laced with homophobia and misogyny. In this mostly humourless context, the brief yet somehow still incoherent story is beyond aggravating.
5.5/10 (Poor)

Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery (1997)

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A 1960s hipster secret agent is brought out of cryofreeze to oppose his greatest enemy in the 1990s, where his social attitudes are glaringly out of place. (IMDb)

It’s hard not to appreciate the top-to-bottom goofiness here. Groan-inducing puns (Alotta Fagina), eye-rolling punchlines (“I never forget a pussy… cat”), spy satire (“I too like to live dangerously”), repetition humour (“Sh!”), self-aware trope jokes (“I’m going to place him in an easily escapable situation…”), silly plot twists (see Dr. Evil’s father-son drama), clever sight gags (see the final cover-up scene): It’s no wonder there’s only five minutes of story, and it’s better for it!

6.5/10 (Alright)

Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (1999)

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Dr. Evil is back…and has invented a new time machine that allows him to go back to the 60’s and steal Austin Powers’s mojo, inadvertently leaving him “shagless”. (IMDb)
There’s nary a hint of a substantial plot or complex characters here, but with an ample amount of often surprisingly clever humour (the synonyms for penis gags are great), the film manages to get by on pure silliness–and a good amount of self-aware jabs at its own shoddy storytelling don’t hurt either (“… just enjoy yourself!”). The multiple-character Myers is undeniably creative and while not all of his jokes land on their feet, enough do to overshadow the film’s lack of anything else.
6.5/10 (Alright)